STANDARD PRIMITIVES
Non-standard projections and the willing suspension of disbelief
2015



sp1_web Exhibition View



sp2_web Exhibition View



sp3_web Exhibition View



sp4_web Exhibition View



sp7_web Digital Study - 4243 x 6000 Pixel



sp8_web Digital Study - 4243 x 6000 Pixel



sp9_web Digital Study - 4243 x 6000 Pixel



sp10_web Digital Study - 4243 x 6000 Pixel



sp11_web Digital Study - 4243 x 6000 Pixel



sp12_web Digital Study - 4243 x 6000 Pixel



sp13_web Analogue Study - Lasercutted Board - 70cm x 50cm



sp14_web Analogue Study - Lasercutted Board - 70cm x 50cm



sp15_web Analogue Study - Lasercutted Board - 70cm x 50cm



sp16_web Analogue Study - Stencil on Acrylic Glass - 100cm x 100cm








Standard Primitives refers to simple geometric objects such as a sphere, a cube or a cylinder. In digital modelling software these elementary geometries are often used as basic matter from which much more complex models are being developed.
In this case the objects are being transformed through non-standard projections. For example a sphere is being dissolved into a certain amount of points with a brightness property. These points are then not linearly projected onto the image plane but are projected twice via a curved surface. The result are bent geometries some of which resemble celestial bodies floating through space. The surfaces of these bodies show intricate details of elevation and depression.
In the exhibition one of these bodies is installed as a free-standing plane with small circular perforations each stemming from one original point of the original object. Thus the installation is literally composed of filtered light just as a stained glassed window in a church.
The affinity of the visual language of religious imagery and the depiction of celestial bodies in science fiction movies becomes apparent. Images of unreachable stars and planets in the infinity of space act similar to religious icons in inspiring awe and overwhelming the viewer. To fully engage with either religion or science fiction it is necessary to find what Samuel Taylor Coleridge called a willing suspension of disbelief. It is necessary to believe.


Standard Primitives was on display at the Silver Linings Exhibition curated by EyeTry.